General Education Requirements

Preamble

The University of Montana-Missoula's General Education Program provides a broad academic base that supports both undergraduate learning at the University of Montana-Missoula and continued learning following graduation. While the General Education Program offers students considerable flexibility in selecting courses, it has a set of common educational objectives for all students.

In accordance with the mission of the University of Montana-Missoula, these objectives are to develop competent and humane individuals who are informed, ethical, literate, and engaged citizens of local and global communities. Students should become acquainted with issues facing contemporary society, participate in the creative arts, develop an understanding of science and technology, cultivate an appreciation of the humanities, and examine the history of different American and global cultures. Upon completion of the general education requirements students should be able to articulate ideas orally and in writing, understand and critically evaluate tangible and abstract concepts, and employ mathematical and other related skills appropriate to a technologically focused society.

In summary, the General Education Program is designed to provide a high quality intellectual foundation that accommodates all UM students whether in liberal arts or professional programs. This foundation will be reinforced, expanded, and refined as students continue through their course of study. Students are encouraged to prepare for productive roles in their chosen fields by cultivating civic awareness vital to the greater community and a democratic society. The acquired skills will allow students to examine critically the human experience and achieve genuine confidence in their knowledge and abilities. For the General Education Program to accomplish its goals, students must assume primary responsibility for their growth and education.

General Education Requirements

Overview

To earn a baccalaureate degree, all students must complete successfully, in addition to any other requirements, the following General Education Requirements. Students who have completed an approved lower-division general education program at an approved Montana institution of higher education should refer to the catalog section on General Education for Transfer Students.

All General Education courses must be at least 3 credits, must be introductory and foundational, and have no more than one pre-requisite. The General Education Committee may allow exceptions for upper-division courses, courses fewer than three credits, and for courses with more than one pre-requisite, if the proposing unit can justify such an exception.

Some courses may satisfy both the "Writing Course" requirement (1.2) and one of the Groups IV through XI.

Some courses may satisfy both Group II and Group III Symbolic Systems.

Some courses may satisfy both Group IX and one of the Groups IV through VIII.

Some courses may satisfy both Group X and one of the Groups IV through VIII. No course may satisfy both Group IX and Group X.

Many of the general education courses listed below require prerequisites be met before registration. The prerequisites are listed in the individual course descriptions.

NOTE! ***All courses taken to satisfy General Education Requirements must be taken for a traditional letter grade and must be passed with a grade of C- or better***.

Students are cautioned that approved courses may change from year to year. To be used for General Education credit, a course must be listed as approved in the Class Schedule for the semester a student registers for it.

Group Letter and Description Credits
Group I: English Writing Skills
1. Composition course WRIT 101 or 201 (ENEX 101, WTS 101, ENEX 200) or an equivalent
3
2. One designated Writing Course
1-3
3. Upper-Division Writing Requirement (as specified by major department)
Group II: Mathematics3
Group III: Modern and Classical Languages - successful completion of a second semester language (test out provisions apply). Some majors have been granted exceptions to the Modern and Classical Language requirement. The majors are listed below. 0-11
Group IV: Expressive Arts3
Group V: Literary and Artistic Studies3
Group VI: Historical and Cultural Studies3
Group VII: Social Sciences3
Group VIII: Ethics and Human Values3
Group IX: American and European Perspectives3
Group X: Indigenous and Global Perspectives3
Group XI: Natural Sciences - One Natural Science course must include a laboratory experience. 6
Total28-491
1

Some courses satisfy more than one group (see list at the end of this section).

Courses that satisfy more than one Group

Title General Education Groups
ANTY 122S Race and Minorities Social Sciences Course (S), Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
ANTY 220S Culture Society Social Sciences Course (S), Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
ANTY 254H Arch Wonders of the World Writing Course-Intermediate, Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
ANTY 326E Indigenous Peoples the Ethics of Development Ethical Human Values Course, Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
ARTH 250L Introduction to Art Criticism Lit Artistic Studies (L), Writing Course-Intermediate
CHMY 305E Ethics, Literature and Writing in the Sciences Ethical Human Values Course, Writing Course-Advanced
CLAS 251L The Epic Lit Artistic Studies (L), Writing Course-Intermediate
CLAS 252L Greek Drama: Politics on Stage Lit Artistic Studies (L), Writing Course-Intermediate
CSCI 215E Social Ethical Issues in CS Ethical Human Values Course, Writing Course-Intermediate
CSCI 315E Computers, Ethics, and Society Ethical Human Values Course, Writing Course-Advanced
DANC 360L World Dance Lit Artistic Studies (L), Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
ENST 335L The Environmental Vision Lit Artistic Studies (L), Writing Course-Advanced
GH 151L Introduction to Western Humanities Antiquity Lit Artistic Studies (L), Writing Course-Intermediate
GH 152L Introduction to the Humanities Medieval to Modern Lit Artistic Studies (L), Writing Course-Intermediate
GPHY 121S Human Geography Social Sciences Course (S), Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
GPHY 141S Geography of World Regions Social Sciences Course (S), Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
GRMN 340L Nature and the Environment in German Literature and Film Lit Artistic Studies (L), Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
GRMN 351H German Culture: Beginnings to Romanticism Writing Course-Advanced, Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
GRMN 352H German Culture 1900-Present Writing Course-Advanced, Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
HONR 121L Ways of Knowing Lit Artistic Studies (L), Writing Course-Intermediate
HONR 122E Ways of Knowing II Ethical Human Values Course, Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
LIT 110L Intro to Lit Lit Artistic Studies (L), Writing Course-Intermediate
LIT 120L Poetry Lit Artistic Studies (L), Writing Course-Intermediate
LIT 202L The Environmental Imagination Lit Artistic Studies (L), Writing Course-Intermediate
LIT 236L Literary Histories Lit Artistic Studies (L), Writing Course-Intermediate
LIT 246L Genres, Themes, Approaches Lit Artistic Studies (L), Writing Course-Intermediate
LIT 353L Milton Lit Artistic Studies (L), Writing Course-Advanced
MUSI 302H Music History II Writing Course-Intermediate, Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
NASX 235X Oral/Written Trads Native Amer Lit Artistic Studies (L), Writing Course-Intermediate, Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
NASX 239X Nat North Amer History Art Lit Artistic Studies (L), Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
NASX 303E Ecol Persp in Nat Amer Trad Ethical Human Values Course, Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
NASX 304E Native American Beliefs/Philos Ethical Human Values Course, Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
PHL 210E Moral Philosophy Ethical Human Values Course, Writing Course-Intermediate
PSCI 210S Intro to American Government Social Sciences Course (S), Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
THTR 101L Introduction to Theatre Lit Artistic Studies (L), Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
THTR 331Y Theatre History II Writing Course-Advanced, Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
WRIT 201 College Writing II Writing Course-Intermediate, Writing Course-Introductory

Group I: Writing

Requirements

Students must satisfy the following three requirements in order:

  1. Introductory College Writing;
  2. Intermediate College Writing;
  3. Advanced College Writing
Introductory College Writing

Students must complete WRIT 101, WRIT 201, or an equivalent composition course with a grade of C-minus or better. Students with Language and Composition AP scores of 4 or better are exempted from this requirement.

Entering students who are placed into WRIT 095, based on their standardized test scores, must successfully complete WRIT 095 prior to enrolling in WRIT 101 or WRIT 201. Such students may challenge their placement with specific scores from the University Writing Assessment. Entering student who place into WRIT 201 may choose to take WRIT 101 instead.

Intermediate College Writing

Students must pass one Intermediate College Writing course with a grade of C-minus or better. The courses satisfying this requirement are listed in the catalog. Students are exempted from this requirement by transferring more than 27 semester credits at the time of their initial registration at the University. Transfer students transferring fewer than 27 credits need to petition the Writing Committee to have writing courses from other institutions accepted for this requirement. View details regarding this process on the transfer student admission page of the catalog.

Advanced College Writing

All students must complete one Advanced College Writing course with a grade of C-minus or better. The courses satisfying this requirement differ according to the student's major. Students should consult the University catalog and their major advisor for the specific courses that fulfill this requirement.

Students may not use the same writing course to meet both the Intermediate College Writing and the Advanced College Writing requirement.

Intermediate Writing Courses

The following courses are designated as Intermediate Writing Courses for this catalog year. Students are cautioned that courses may change from year to year. To be used for General Education, a course must be listed as Intermediate Writing in the catalog and in the Class Schedule for the semester a student registers for it.

ANTY 310Human Variation3
ANTY 254HArch Wonders of the World3
ARTH 250LIntroduction to Art Criticism3
BMGT 205Professional Business Comm3
BMGT 212Critical Analysis for Business3
C&I 287Business Communications3
CLAS 251LThe Epic3
CLAS 252LGreek Drama: Politics on Stage3
CSCI 108Interdisciplinary Computing: Practical Computational Problem Solving3
CSCI 215ESocial & Ethical Issues in CS3
ECNS 433Economics of the Environment3
ENST 201Environmental Info Resources3
ENST 231HNature and Society3
FILM 320Shakespeare and Film3
GH 151LIntroduction to Western Humanities Antiquity3
GH 152LIntroduction to the Humanities Medieval to Modern3
HONR 121LWays of Knowing3
HSTA 315Early American Republic3
HSTA 347Voodoo, Muslim, Church: Black Religion3
HSTA 385Families & Children in America3
HSTR 300Writing For History3
HSTR 334Latin America: Reform & Revolution3
HSTR 401The Great Historians3
IRSH 380Topics in Irish Studies3
JRNL 270Reporting3
LIT 110LIntro to Lit3
LIT 120LPoetry3
LIT 202LThe Environmental Imagination3
LIT 236LLiterary Histories3
LIT 246LGenres, Themes, Approaches3
LSCI 391Special Topics1-9
MART 300Visions of Film3
NASX 280NA Studies Rsrch Theors/Mthds3
NASX 235XOral/Written Trads Native Amer3
NRSM 200Nat.Resource Professional Wrtg3
PHL 210EMoral Philosophy3
THTR 330HTheatre History I3
WRIT 121Intro to Technical Writing3
WRIT 201College Writing II3
WRIT 325Science Writing3

Advanced Writing Courses

The following courses are designated as Advanced Writing Courses for this catalog year. Students should consult with their advisor regarding the requirement specified by their major.

AHAT 342Therapeutic Interventions2
ANTY 314Principles of Forensic Anthro3
ANTY 400History of Anthropology3
ANTY 402Quan Ethnographic Field Methds3
ANTY 408Advanced Anthro Statistics3
ANTY 430Social Anthropology3
ANTY 450Archaeological Theory3
ANTY 451Cultural Resource Management3
ANTY 455Artifact Analysis3
ARTH 350Contemp Art and Art Criticism3
ARTH 434Latin American Art3
BGEN 499Strategic Management3
BIOH 462Principles Medical Physiology3
CHMY 305EEthics, Literature and Writing in the Sciences3
CLAS 399Capstone3
COMX 347Rhetoric Nature & Environmtlsm3
COMX 413Comm & Conflict-Writing3
COMX 414Comm in Personal Relationshps3
COMX 421Comm in Non-Profit Organizatns3
COMX 422Communication and Technology3
COMX 424Risk Crisis & Comm3
COMX 445Rhetorical Criticism & Theory3
COMX 447Rhetorical Contruction of Women3
COMX 449Rhetoric of Women's Activism3
CSCI 315EComputers, Ethics, and Society3
CSCI 499Senior Thesis/Capstone1-6
CSD 430Senior Capstone3
DANC 494Junior/Senior Seminar3
ECNS 481Communicating Economics3
ECNS 488Res Meth & Thesis Design2
ECNS 499Senior Thesis/Capstone2
EDU 397Methods: Teaching & Assessing3
EDEC 454PK-3 Language Arts and Reading Methods3
ENST 382Environmental Law3
ENST 335LThe Environmental Vision3
ENST 367Environmental Politics & Policies3
ENST 487Globalization, Justice & Environment3
GEO 320Global Water4
GEO 499Senior Thesis /Capstone3-10
GH 484Novel Ancient and Modern3
GPHY 335Water Policy3
GPHY 433Cultural Ecology3
GPHY 499senior thesis / capstone3
GRMN 351HGerman Culture: Beginnings to Romanticism3
GRMN 352HGerman Culture 1900-Present3
HEE 301Meth of Secondary HE3
HSTA 415The Black Radical Tradition3
HSTA 417Prayer & Civil Rights3
HSTA 461Research in Montana History3
HSTA 471Writing Women's Lives3
HSTR 400Historical Research Seminar3
HSTR 418Britain 1500 - 18003
HSTR 437US-Latin America Relations3
JPNS 311Jpns Clasc Lit Engl Trans3
JPNS 312Jpns Lit Medieval to Mod3
JRNL 340Intermediate Audio3
JRNL 352Intermediate Video Reporting and Production3
JRNL 362Feature Writing3
JRNL 370Public Affairs Reporting3
KIN 447Analytical & Communicative Techniques3
LING 473Language and Culture3
LING 484NA Indigenous Lang & Ling3
LIT 300Literary Criticism3
LIT 304U.S. Writers of Color3
LIT 314The American Novel3
LIT 327Shakespeare3
LIT 342Montana Writers3
LIT 343African American Lit3
LIT 353LMilton3
LIT 376Lit & Other Disciplines3
LIT 494Seminar: Lit Capstone3
M 499Senior Thesis1-12
M 429History of Mathematics3
MART 450Topics in Film/Media Studies3
MCLG 315Major Hispanic Authors3
MCLG/RUSS 494Sem in Foreign Literatures1-3
MUSI 302HMusic History II3
MUSI 415Music 20th Century to Present3
MUSI 416Topics in Music History3
MUSI 417Cultural Studies in Music3
NASX 494Seminar/Workshop3
PHAR 550Drug Literature Eval3
PHL 499Senior Seminar3
PHSX 330Communicating Physics3
PSCI 400Adv Writing in Pol Science1
PSYX 320Research Methods III3
PSYX 400History & System in Psychology3
PTRM 451Tourism & Sustainability3
PTRM 482Wilderness & Protctd Area Mgt3
RUSS 494Seminar in Russian Studies1-3
SOCI 438Seminar in Crime & Deviance3
SOCI 441Capstone: Inequal and Soc Just3
SOCI 460Capstone: Rural and Env Change3
SOCI 488Writing for Sociology3
S W 300Hum Behav & Soc Environ3
S W 310S W Policy & Services3
THTR 331YTheatre History II3
WGSS 363Feminist Theory and Methods3
WILD 408Advanced Fisheries3
WILD 470Conserv of Wildlife Populatns4

Group II Mathematics

Mathematical literacy implies an appreciation of the beauty of mathematics, an ability to apply mathematical reasoning, and an understanding of how mathematics and statistics are used in many arenas. Mathematical literacy may be attained through the study of the properties of numbers, mathematical modeling, geometry, data analysis and probability, with the overarching goal of learning mathematical reasoning and problem solving.

Mathematical literacy cannot be achieved in a single course. However, for the purposes of general education, the mathematical literacy requirement can be met by any one of the following:

  1. achieving a grade of C- or better in one of the following courses which address different aspects of mathematical literacy:
    M 104Numbers as News3
    M 105Contemporary Mathematics3
    M 115Probability and Linear Mathematics3
    M 118118 Mathematics for Music Enthusiasts3
    M 121College Algebra3
    M 122College Trigonometry3
    M 132Numbers and Operations for Elementary School Teachers3
    M 133Geometry and Measurement for Elementary School Teachers3
    M 151Precalculus4
    M 162Applied Calculus4
    M 171Calculus I4
    M 172Calculus II4
    M 181Honors Calculus I4
    M 182Honors Calculus II4
    STAT 216Introduction to Statistics4
    or a mathematics course of 3 or more credits for which one of these is a prerequisite.
  2. achieving a score of 50 or better on the CLEP College Algebra Test, the CLEP College Precalculus Test, or the CLEP College Mathematics Test.
  3. passing the Mathematical Literacy Examination administered by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. To qualify to take the Mathematical Literacy Examination, a student must have achieved a score of 630 or better on the SAT Math exam or a score of 28 or better on the ACT Math exam. A student may take the Mathematical Literacy Examination only once. Further details are available from the Department of Mathematical Sciences.

Students must complete the mathematical literacy requirement by the time they have earned 30 credits; if not, they must register for a mathematical sciences course every semester until they have completed the requirement. Because many other courses at the university assume some mathematical literacy, it is strongly recommended that all students complete their mathematical literacy requirement as soon as possible.

Upon completion of the mathematical literacy requirement, a student will be able to effectively apply mathematical or statistical reasoning to a variety of applied or theoretical problems.

Group III: Modern and Classical Language

The language requirement can be met in any of the following ways:

  1. by achieving a C- or better in a second-semester language course offered at the University of Montana (see list of courses below);2
  2. by achieving a grade of C- or above in a language course numbered 201 or above at the University of Montana (see list of courses below);
  3. by presenting a transcript record of completion with a grade of C- or better of a second- semester (or more advanced) language course at an accredited college or university;
  4. by achieving an appropriate score on a placement exam administered by the offering department;
  5. by receiving verification of an appropriate level of proficiency in any other natural language in collaboration with the department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures. Note that the student’s native language, if it is not English, can be used to fulfill this requirement.
2

Three 3-credit courses of Irish are required to fulfill the general education requirement.

Upon completion of the Modern and Classical Languages requirement, the student will have a basic functional knowledge of a second natural language sufficient to:

  • read and write if the language is classical, such as Latin or classical Greek;
  • speak and aurally comprehend, if the language does not have a written tradition, such as Salish;
  • perform all four skills (speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing) if the language is modern and has a written tradition, such as Japanese or French;
  • demonstrate both receptive (visual comprehension) and expressive (manual production) proficiency if the language is American Sign Language.

The courses listed below require prerequisites be met before registration. The prerequisites for the following courses are listed in the individual course descriptions.

ARAB
Select one of the following:3-5
Elementary Modern Standard Arabic II
Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I
Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II
Adv Modern Standard Arabic I
Adv Modern Standard Arabic II
CHIN
Select one of the following:3-5
Elementary Chinese II
Intermediate Chinese I
Intermediate Chinese II
Advanced Chinese I
Advanced Chinese II
CSD
CSD 132American Sign Language II3
FRCH
Select one of the following:3-4
Elementary French II
Intermediate French I
Intermediate French II
Adv Grammar/Oral Writ Exprsn
GH
Special Topics (Elementary Hindi 2 sections only)
GRMN
Select one of the following:3-4
Elementary German II
Intermediate German I
Intermediate German II
German: Oral and Written Expression I
German Oral & Written Expresion II
GRK
Select one of the following:3
Elementary Greek II
Intermediate Greek I
Intermediate Greek II
ITLN
ITLN 102Elementary Italian II4
JPNS
Select one of the following:4-5
Elementary Japanese II
Intermediate Japanese I
Intermediate Japanese II
Advanced Japanese
Advanced Japanese
LATN
Select one of the following:3
Elementary Latin II
Intermediate Latin I
Intermediate Latin II
NASX
NASX 142Elementary Blackfoot II4
RUSS
Select one of the following:3-4
Elementary Russian II
Intermediate Russian I
Intermediate Russian II
Russian: Oral & Written Expr I
Russian: Oral and Writen Expr II
SPNS
Select one of the following:3-4
Elementary Spanish II
Intermediate Spanish I
Intermediate Spanish II
Spanish: Oral and Written Expr
IRSH
IRSH 101
IRSH 102
IRSH 103
Elementary Irish
and Elementary Irish II
and Elementary Irish III 3
11
3

Three 3 credit courses of Irish are required to fulfill the general education requirement

  • Students may satisfy the requirement by demonstrating equivalent skill in any of these or other languages in testing administered by the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literature's.
  • International students from non English speaking countries may satisfy this requirement by presenting a TOEFL score of 580 or greater.

Group III: Exceptions to the Modern and Classical Language Requirement

The extended majors listed below have been granted exceptions to the Modern and Classical Language requirement.  Students graduating in any one of these majors are not required to complete the Modern and Classical Language requirement.  Students graduating with an Associate of Arts degree have also been granted an exception to the Group III requirements.  Missoula College students who continue to Mountain Campus without graduating will need to complete Group III unless their declared four-year major has been granted an exception.

Accounting & Finance, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Curriculum & Instruction, Ecosystem Science & Restoration, Forestry, Geoscience, Health and Human Performance, Management Information Systems, Management & Marketing, Mathematics or combined Mathematics /Computer Science or Computer Science/Mathematics, Media Arts - Bachelor of Fine Arts only (BA students take Foreign Language), Medical Laboratory Science, Microbiology, Music and Music Education, Neuroscience, Pharmacy, Parks, Tourism and Recreation Management, Resource Conservation, Theatre - Bachelor of Fine Arts only IBA students take Modern and Classical Language requirement), Wildlife Biology

Group IV: Expressive Arts (A)

Expressive Arts courses are activity-based and emphasize the value of learning by doing in an artistic context. Upon completion of an Expressive Arts course, students will be able to express themselves in the making of an original work or creative performance; understand the genres and/or forms that have shaped the medium; and critique the quality of their own work and that of others.

ARTZ 103AArt for Non-Majors3
ARTZ 105AVisual Language - Drawing3
ARTZ 106AVisual Language - 2-D Fndtns3
ARTZ 108AVisual Language - 3-D Fndtns3
ARTZ 131ACeramics for Non-majors3
ARTZ 211ADrawing I3
ARTZ 221APainting I3
ARTZ 231ACeramics I3
ARTZ 251ASculpture I3
ARTZ 271APrintmaking I3
ARTZ 284APhoto I-Techs and Processes3
ARTZ 302AElementary School Art2
ARTZ 394ASeminar- Environmental Drawing3
COMX 111AIntro to Public Speaking3
COMX 217AOral Interpretation of Lit3
CRWR 210AIntro Fiction Workshop3
CRWR 211AIntro Poetry Workshop3
CRWR 212AIntro Nonfiction Workshop3
CRWR 312AInterm Nonfiction Workshop3
DANC 100AIntroduction to Modern Dance2
DANC 108ADance Forms3
DANC 110AIntroduction to Ballet2
DANC 115AIntroduction to Jazz Dance2
DANC 129ADance Performance Lab I1
DANC 130AIntroduction to Dance3
DANC 160ADance Forms: Irish2
DANC 165ADance Forms: African2
DANC 170ADance Forms: Tribal Belly2
DANC 200AContemporary Modern II2
DANC 210ABallet II2
DANC 215AJazz Dance II2
DANC 220ACreative Practice I3
DANC 229ADance Performance Lab II1
DDSN 113ATechnical Drafting3
ENST 373ANature Works3
JRNL 140AIntro Radio/Audio Storytelling3
MART 112AIntroduction to Film Editing3
MART 111AIntro to Photoshop3
MUSI 102APerformance Study1-2
MUSI 108AOrchestra: UMSO1
MUSI 110AOpera Theatre I1
MUSI 111ASinging for Non-Majors2
MUSI 112AChoir1
MUSI 114ABand: UM Concert Band1
MUSI 122APercussion Ensemble: UM1
MUSI 123AWorld Percussion Ensemble1
MUSI 131AJazz Ensemble I: UM Jazz Bands1
MUSI 135AKeyboard Skills I1
MUSI 136AKeyboard Skills II1
MUSI 155AMarching: Grizzly Marchng Band1
MUSI 160ABeginning Guitar2
MUSI 162AChamber Ensembles I1
MUSI 267AComposer's Workshop1
MUSI 304ASound in the Natural World3
MUST 227AMtn Electroacoustc Lptp Ens I1
THTR 102AIntroduction to Theatre Design3
THTR 106ATheat Prod I: Run Crew1
THTR 107ATheat Prod I: Constr Crew3
THTR 113AIntroduction to Voice Acting3
THTR 120AIntroduction to Acting I3
THTR 220AActing I3
THTR 239ACreative Drama/Dance: K-82

Group V: Literary and Artistic Studies (L)

In these courses, students develop familiarity with significant works of artistic representation, including literature, music, visual art, and/or performing arts. Through this experience, students enhance their analytical skills and explore the historical, aesthetic, philosophical, and cultural features of these works.

Upon completion of a Literary and Artistic Studies course, students will be able to:

  1. analyze works of art with respect to structure and significance within literary and artistic traditions, including emergent movements and forms; and
  2. develop coherent arguments that critique these works from a variety of approaches, such as historical, aesthetic, cultural, psychological, political, and philosophical.
ARTH 160LGlobal Visual Culture3
ARTH 250LIntroduction to Art Criticism3
CHIN 313LChinese Poetry in Translation3
CHIN 314LTraditiona Chinese Literature3
CLAS 155LSurvey of Greek and Roman Lit3
CLAS 160LClassical Mythology3
CLAS 251LThe Epic3
CLAS 252LGreek Drama: Politics on Stage3
COMX 140LIntro to Visual Rhetoric3
CRWR 115LMontana Writers Live3
DANC 234LDance in Popular Movies3
DANC 360LWorld Dance3
ENST 335LThe Environmental Vision3
FILM 103LIntroduction to Film3
GH 151LIntroduction to Western Humanities Antiquity3
GH 152LIntroduction to the Humanities Medieval to Modern3
GH 161HAsian Humanities3
GH 327LGender & Sexuality in Eng Fict3
GH 328LGender Sexuality India3
GH 351LExploring the Humanities3
GRMN 322LSurvey of German Cinema3
GRMN 340LNature and the Environment in German Literature and Film3
HONR 121LWays of Knowing3
IRSH 345LLiterature in the Irish Lang3
LIT 110LIntro to Lit3
LIT 120LPoetry3
LIT 202LThe Environmental Imagination3
LIT 236LLiterary Histories3
LIT 246LGenres, Themes, Approaches3
LIT 280LEcology of Literature3
LIT 349LMedieval Lit3
LIT 350LChaucer3
LIT 353LMilton3
LIT 378LGay and Lesbian Studies3
MART 101LIntro to Media Arts3
MUSI 101LEnjoyment of Music3
MUSI 130LHistory of Jazz3
MUSI 132LHistory of Rock & Roll3
MUSI 133LCntry Msc:Cowbys,Opry,Nshville3
MUSI 202LIntro to Music Literature3
NASX 235XOral/Written Trads Native Amer3
NASX 239XNat North Amer History & Art3
RLST 205LIntroduction to New Testament3
RLST 225LChristianity3
RUSS 306LEvil and the Supernatural in Russian Literature3
RUSS 307LBeauty, Power and Pride in Russian Literature3
THTR 101LIntroduction to Theatre3
THTR 235LDramatic Literature3
WGSS 163LHist/Lit Persp Women3

Group VI: Historical and Cultural Studies (H)

These courses present the historical or cultural contexts of ideas and institutions, and examine cultural development or differentiation in the human past. They are foundational in that they are wide-ranging in chronological, geographical, or topical focus, or in that they introduce students to methods of inquiry specific to a particular discipline.

Upon completion of a Historical and Cultural Studies course, students will be able to:

  1. synthesize ideas and information with a view to understanding the causes and consequences of historical developments and events;
  2. evaluate texts or artifacts within their historical and/or cultural contexts;
  3. analyze human behavior, ideas, and institutions within their respective historical and/or cultural contexts.
AAST 141HBlack: From Africa to Hip-Hop3
AAST 208HDiscovering Africa3
ANTY 101HAnthro & the Human Experience3
ANTY 102HIntro to South & S. East Asia3
ANTY 103HIntro Latin American Studies3
ANTY 141HThe Silk Road3
ANTY 241HCentral Asian Culture and Civ3
ANTY 251HFoundations of Civilization3
ANTY 254HArch Wonders of the World3
ANTY 351HArchaeology of North America3
ANTY 354HMesoamerican Prehistory3
ARTH 200HArt of World Civilization I3
ARTH 201HArt of World Civilization II3
ARTH 202HAlternative Approaches to Art History3
ARTH 333HArchitectural History I3
ARTH 334HArchitectural History II3
ARTH 433HAncient American Art3
CHIN 211HChinese Culture and Civiliz3
CLAS 180HEnv & Nat in Classical World3
CLAS 360HAncient Greek Civ and Culture3
COMX 240HIntro to Rhetorical Theory3
CSWA 262HIslamic Civil: Classical Age3
ENST 230HNature and Society3
ENST 231HNature and Society3
GH 161HAsian Humanities3
GRMN 106HIntroduction to German Culture and Civilization3
GRMN 351HGerman Culture: Beginnings to Romanticism3
GRMN 352HGerman Culture 1900-Present3
HSTA 101H/103HAmerican History I4
HSTA 102H/104HAmerican History II4
HSTA 342HAfr Amer Hist to 18653
HSTA 343HAfr Amer Hist Since 18653
HSTA 370HWmn Amer Colonial to Civil War3
HSTA 371HWmn Amer Civil War to Present3
HSTR 101H/103HWestern Civilization I4.000
HSTR 102H/104HWestern Civilization II4
HSTR 230HColonial Latin America3
HSTR 231HModern Latin America3
HSTR 241HCentral Asian Cult & Civ3
HSTR 262HIslamic Civil: Classical Age3
HSTR 264HIslamic Civ: Modrn Era3
HSTR 301XAncient Greek Social History3
HSTR 302HAncient Greece3
JPNS 150HJapanese Cult & Civiliz3
JRNL 100HMedia History and Literacy3
MCLG 100HIntro Latin American Studies3
MUSI 207HWorld Music (equiv to 307)3
MUSI 301HMusic History I3
MUSI 302HMusic History II3
NASX 105HIntro Native Amer Studies3
NASX 405HGndr Iss in Native Amer Stdies3
PHL 241NHist & Philosophy of Science3
PHL 363HAncient Greek and Roman Philosophy3
RLST 204HIntro to the Hebrew Bible3
RLST/SSEA 232HBuddhism3
RLST 238XJapanese Religions3
RUSS 105HIntro to Russian Culture3
SSEA 202XIntroduction to India3
THTR 330HTheatre History I3

Group VII: Social Sciences (S)

Social science courses describe and analyze human social organization and interaction, employing social data at a broad scale with statistical relevance, experimental data on individuals or groups, or qualitative data based on observation and discourse.

Upon completion of a Social Sciences course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the nature, structure, and historical development of human behavior, organizations, social phenomena, and/or relationships;
  2. use theory in explaining these individual, group, or social phenomena; and/or
  3. understand, assess, and evaluate how conclusions and generalizations are justified based on data
ANTY 122SRace and Minorities3
ANTY 220SCulture & Society3
ANTY 250SIntro to Archaeology3
BFIN 205SPersonal Finance3
BGEN 105SIntroduction to Business3
BGEN/CCS 160SIssues in Sustainability3
BMGT 101SIntro to Entertainment Mgmt3
COMX 115SIntroduction to Interpersonal Communications3
COMX 202SNonverbal Communication3
COMX 219SSurvey of Children's Comm3
COMX 220SIntro to Organizational Comm3
COUN 242SIntimate Relationships3
ECNS 101SEconomic Way of Thinking3
ECNS 201SPrinciples of Microeconomics3
ECNS 202SPrinciples of Macroeconomics3
ENST 489SEnvironmental Justice Issues & Solutions3
GPHY 121SHuman Geography3
GPHY 141SGeography of World Regions3
GPHY 323SEconomic Geography of Rural Areas3
LING 270SIntro to Linguistics3
NRSM 121SNature of Montana3
NRSM 370SWildland Conserv Pol/Govrnance3
PSCI 210SIntro to American Government3
PSCI 220SIntro to Comparative Govt3
PSYX 100SIntro to Psychology3
PSYX 161SFund of Organizational Psych3
PTRM 210SNature Tourism & Comm Rec3
PTRM 217SParks & Outdoor Rec. Mgmt.3
SOCI 101SIntroduction to Sociology3
SOCI 130SSoc of Alternative Religions3
SOCI 211SIntroduction to Criminology3
SOCI 212SSocial Issues Southeast Asia3
SOCI 220SRace, Gender & Class3
SOCI 275SGender and Society3
WGSS 263SSocial and Political Perspectives on Women, Men, and Sexuality3

Group VIII: Ethics and Human Values (E)

Ethics and Human Values courses familiarize students with one or more traditions of ethical thought. These courses rigorously present the basic concepts and forms of reasoning that define and distinguish each tradition. The focus of these courses may be on one or more of these traditions, or on a concept such as justice or the good life as conceptualized within one or more of these traditions, or on a professional practice within a particular tradition.

Upon completion of an Ethics and Human Values course, students will be able to:

  1. correctly apply the basic concepts and forms of reasoning from the tradition or professional practice they studied to ethical issues that arise within those traditions or practices;
  2. analyze and critically evaluate the basic concepts and forms of reasoning from the tradition or professional practice they studied.
AHMS 270EMedical Ethics3
ANTY 326EIndigenous Peoples & the Ethics of Development3
BGEN 220EBusiness Ethics and Social Responsibility3
CHMY 305EEthics, Literature and Writing in the Sciences3
CLAS 365EThe Roots of Western Ethics3
CSCI 215ESocial & Ethical Issues in CS3
CSCI 315EComputers, Ethics, and Society3
EDU 407EEthics & Policy Issues3
ENST 320EEarth Ethics3
GEO 304EScience and Society3
GH 389EPlacebos: The Power of Words3
HONR 122EWays of Knowing II3
HONR 320EResearch Portfolio Seminar3
HSTR 272ETerrorism:Viol Mod Wrld3
HTH 475ELegal and Ethical Issues Health and Exercise Professions3
NASX 303EEcol Persp in Nat Amer Trad3
NASX 304ENative American Beliefs/Philos3
NRSM 449EClimate Change Ethics/Policy3
PHAR 514ECase Studies Pharm Ethics3
NRSM 389EEthics Forestry & Conservation3.000
PHL 110EIntroduction to Ethics3
PHL 112EIntro Ethics and Environment3
PHL 114EIntro to Political Ethics3
PHL 210EMoral Philosophy3
PHL 321EPhilosophy & Biomedical Ethics3
PSCI 250EIntro to Political Theory3
RLST 281EComparative Ethics3
S W 410ESocial Work Ethics3

Group IX: Democracy and Citizenship (Y)

These courses ground students in the ideas, institutions, and practices of democratic societies and their historical antecedents. Knowledge gained through courses in the Y perspective prepares students to understand the rights and responsibilities of engaged citizenship and to assess the characteristics, contributions, and contradictions of democratic systems.

Upon completion of a Democracy and Citizenship course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate informed and reasoned understanding of democratic ideas, institutions and practices, from historical and/or contemporary perspectives;
  2. Analyze and evaluate the significance and complexities of engaged citizenship; and
  3. Articulate the causes and consequences of key historical and/or contemporary struggles within democratic systems or their antecedents, including but not limited to those pertaining to issues of diversity, equity, and justice.
ANTY 122SRace and Minorities3
ARTH 201HArt of World Civilization II3
COMX 205YDeliberative Democracy3
GRMN 340LNature and the Environment in German Literature and Film3
GRMN 351HGerman Culture: Beginnings to Romanticism3
GRMN 352HGerman Culture 1900-Present3
HONR 122EWays of Knowing II3
HSTA 101H/103HAmerican History I4
HSTA 102H/104HAmerican History II4
HSTR 101H/103HWestern Civilization I4.000
HSTR 102H/104HWestern Civilization II4
JRNL 100HMedia History and Literacy3
JRNL 102YNews Literacy3
LSCI 210YWho Owns Culture? An Introduction to Copyright3
MUSI 301HMusic History I3
MUSI 302HMusic History II3
PHL 101YIntroduction to Philosophy3
PHL 102YTopical Intro to Philosophy3-4
PHL 261YHistory of Ancient Philosophy3
PHL 262YHistory of Modern Philosophy3
PSCI 210SIntro to American Government3
PTRM 141YNational Parks and American Culture3
RUSS 105HIntro to Russian Culture3
THTR 101LIntroduction to Theatre3
THTR 331YTheatre History II3

Group X: Cultural & International Diversity (X)

These courses foster an appreciation for diverse cultures, their histories and contemporary forms, and their positions in world spheres of power and change. This includes knowledge of diverse cultures in comparative and thematic frameworks. Knowledge gained through courses in the X perspective prepares students to cultivate ways of thinking that foster an understanding of the complexities of indigenous or international cultures and global issues, past and present.

Upon completion of a course in this group, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the diverse ways humans structure their social, political, and cultural lives;
  2. Interpret human activities, ideas, and institutions with reference to diverse cultural, historical and geo-political perspectives and physical environments; and
  3. Recognize the complexities of inter-cultural and international communications and collaborative endeavors, and relate this to the complex challenges of the 21st century.
AAST 141HBlack: From Africa to Hip-Hop3
ANTY 101HAnthro & the Human Experience3
ANTY 102HIntro to South & S. East Asia3
ANTY 103HIntro Latin American Studies3
ANTY 133XFood and Culture3
ANTY 141HThe Silk Road3
ANTY 150XArchaeology of Yellowstone: 11,000 Years of Native Americans in Yellowstone National Park3
ANTY 220SCulture & Society3
ANTY 241HCentral Asian Culture and Civ3
ANTY 251HFoundations of Civilization3
ANTY 254HArch Wonders of the World3
ANTY 323XNative Peoples of Montana3
ANTY 326EIndigenous Peoples & the Ethics of Development3
ANTY 330XPeoples and Cultures of World3
ANTY 351HArchaeology of North America3
ANTY 352XArchaeology of Montana3
ARTH 200HArt of World Civilization I3
CAS 140XAddictions and Diversity3
CCS 103XIntro Climate Change:Sci & Soc3
COMX 204XInternational & Dvlpmnt Comm3
COMX 212XIntro to Intercultural Com3
DANC 360LWorld Dance3
ECNS 217XIssues in Economic Development3
GPHY 121SHuman Geography3
GPHY 141SGeography of World Regions3
GPHY 245XThe Middle East3
HSTR 230HColonial Latin America3
HSTR 231HModern Latin America3
HSTR 241HCentral Asian Cult & Civ3
HSTR 301XAncient Greek Social History3
JPNS 150HJapanese Cult & Civiliz3
LING 375XLinguistic Ecology and Language Endangerment3
MCLG 100HIntro Latin American Studies3
MUSI 207HWorld Music (equiv to 307)3
NASX 105HIntro Native Amer Studies3
NASX 201XIndian Cultr Exprssd Thru Lang3
NASX 210XNative Amer Sports & Games3
NASX 231XIndig World View Perspectives3
NASX 235XOral/Written Trads Native Amer3
NASX 239XNat North Amer History & Art3
NASX 260XIndig Community Developmnt3
NASX 303EEcol Persp in Nat Amer Trad3
NASX 304ENative American Beliefs/Philos3
NASX 354XIndians of MT since Rsrvtn Era3
PSCI 230XIntro to International Rel3
PTRM 345XSustaining Human Soc & Nat Env3-6
RLST/SSEA 232HBuddhism3
RLST 234XHindu Religious Traditions3
RLST 238XJapanese Religions3
SSEA 202XIntroduction to India3
WGSS 150XWomen's Rights and Women's Roles Around the World3

Group XI: Natural Science (N)

These courses present scientific conclusions about the structure and function of the natural world, and demonstrate or exemplify scientific questioning and validation of findings.

Upon completion of a Natural Science course, a student will be able to:

  1. understand the general principles associated with the discipline(s) studied; 
  2. understand the methodology and activities scientists use to gather, validate and interpret data related to natural processes; 
  3. detect patterns, draw conclusions, develop conjectures and hypotheses, and test them by appropriate means and experiments;
  4. understand how scientific laws and theories are verified by quantitative measurement, scientific observation, and logical/critical reasoning;
  5. and understand the means by which analytic uncertainty is quantified and expressed in the natural sciences

Natural Science courses without a laboratory experience

ANTY 210NIntro to Physical Anthropology3
ANTY 211NAnthropological Genetics3
ASTR 131NPlanetary Astronomy3
ASTR 132NStars, Galaxies, and the Universe3
BIOB 130NEvolution and Society3
BIOB 160NPrinciples of Living Systems3
BIOB 170NPrincpls Biological Diversity3
BIOE 172NIntroductory Ecology3
BIOM 135NHot Spring Micb: Yellowstone3
BIOM 250NMicrobiology for Hlth Sciences3
BIOO 101NSurvey MT Wldlife & Habitats3
CHMY 121NIntroduction to General Chemistry3
CHMY 141NCollege Chemistry I4
CHMY 143NCollege Chemistry II4
CJUS 125NFund of Forensic Science3
CSD 221NFundamentals of Acoustics3
ENSC 105NEnvironmental Science3
ERTH/CCS 303NWeather and Climate3
GEO 101NIntroduction to Physical Geology3
GEO 103NIntroduction to Environmental Geology3
GEO 105NOceanography3
GEO 107NNatural Disasters3
CCS 108NClimate Change3
GPHY 111NIntro to Physical Geography3
GPHY 311NBiogeography3
NRGY 101NIntro to Sustainable Energy3
NRSM 271NConservation Ecology3
NUTR 221NBasic Human Nutrition3
PHAR 110NUse & Abuse of Drugs3
PHL 241NHist & Philosophy of Science3
PHSX 141NEinstein's Relativity3
PHSX 205NCollege Physics I4
PHSX 207NCollege Physics II4
PHSX 215NFund of Physics w/Calc I4
PHSX 217NFund of Physics w/Calc II4
PSYX 250NFund of Biological Psychology3
SCN 100NIssues in Biology3
SCN 175NIntegrated Physical Science I3
WILD 105NWildlife & People3

Natural Science courses with a laboratory experience

ANTY 213NPhysical Anthropology Lab1
ASTR 134NPlanetary Astronomy Lab1
ASTR 135NStars, Galaxies, and the Universe Lab1
ASTR 142NThe Evolving Universe4
BIOB 101NDiscover Biology3
BIOB 161NPrncpls of Living Systems Lab1
BIOB 171NPrincpls Biological Dvrsty Lab2
BIOB 226NGen Science: Earth & Life Sci5
BIOH 201NHuman Anat Phys I (equiv 301)4
BIOH 202NHuman Anat and Phys I Lab4
BIOH 211NHuman Anat Phys II (equiv 311)4
BIOH 212NHuman Anat Phys II Lab4
BIOO 105NIntroduction to Botany3
CHMY 142NCollege Chemistry I Lab1
CHMY 144NCollege Chemistry II Lab1
FORS 241NDendrology3
GEO 102NIntroduction to Physical Geology Lab1
GEO 104NIntroduction to Environmental Geology Laboratory1
GEO 106NHistory of Life3
GPHY 112NIntro to Phys Geography Lab1
NRSM 210NSoils, Water and Climate3
PHSX 206NCollege Physics I Laboratory1
PHSX 208NCollege Physics II Laboratory1
PHSX 216NPhysics Laboratory I w/Calc1
PHSX 218NPhysics Laboratory II w/Calc1
PHSX 225NGen Science: Phys & Chem Sci5
SCN 105NMontana Ecosystems3
SCN 260NThe Biology of Behavior3